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Marijuana: 100 Benefits

    • 4 posts
    July 25, 2014 2:15:22 AM PDT

    Hey guys! I am new on here and was referred by Ixekizumab law@Twitter. I am a indie author who is working on several books dedicated to telling the great benefits of medical marijuana against diseases such as cancer,hepatitis and fibromyalgia. My latest book is called "Marijuana: 100 Benefits", which you can fine on Amazon and iBooks. Here is a tiny sample from my book. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KQXO2YG

    Feel free to ask any questions! :)

    Prevents Nausea and Vomiting.  Studies have shown that marijuana can be effective against the nausea and vomiting that can follow chemotherapy, certain surgeries, treatments for AIDS, and more.  By suppressing this side effect it would also prevent against unhealthy weight loss.

    Helps Treat Glaucoma.  Marijuana has been shown to help slow or prevent glaucoma, a disease that can eventually lead to blindness.  A handful of studies has shown that marijuana can take pressure off the eyes, which can help offset glaucoma.

    Protects Against Cancer.  Current research suggests that marijuana may be good for treating certain types of cancer, including breast cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer.  Cancer patients report it being most helpful for treating chemotherapy side effects.   Researchers around the world are currently studying marijuana's effect on cancer for further development.

    Relieves Tourette's Syndrome Side Effects.  Clinical studies have shown that marijuana can be effective against the side effects from Tourette's Syndrome.  Researchers found that THC can help decrease the number of tics one has and it can also decrease one's obsessive compulsive behavior. 

    Helps Decrease Seizures.  There have been several studies on animals and one experimental study on humans on the topic of marijuana and seizures.  In the one human study, the results showed that patients who were exposed to THC showed a decline in the activities of seizures.  Many people who live in countries in which marijuana is legal also report decreases in seizures after smoking marijuana.

    Blocks Migraine Pain.  The chemicals in marijuana and the chemicals in your brain can act together to block your brain's pain receptors, thus preventing the pain that is associated with migraines.  It makes a good alternative to migraine medications that bring on negative side effects.  

    Relieves Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms.  When taken in spray or pill form, marijuana has been found effective in relieving the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis patients.  Studies suggest that the cannabinoids in each plant, rather than the THC content, is what helps relieve the symptoms. 

    ADD/ADHD Treatment.  Though the research is low right now, many doctors are in favor of using marijuana to treat ADD/ADHD instead of the traditional stimulant drugs, since marijuana is not addictive and is therefore much safer, especially for children.  The study that found the strongest evidence that marijuana can treat these disorders found that marijuana can help stimulate certain counteractive chemicals in the brain.  



    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at April 24, 2015 2:48:52 PM PDT
    • 445 posts
    July 25, 2014 1:23:10 PM PDT

    Thanks IndieAuthor for your contribute to DrSocial and for offering your expertise to our users. 

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    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at April 24, 2015 2:49:34 PM PDT
    • 4 posts
    July 26, 2014 2:00:56 AM PDT

    Thank you for the information Dr! :)

    • 4 posts
    July 27, 2014 12:52:42 AM PDT

    Here is another sample of my book. This sample explains some of the cannabis strains and the impact it has on a person.

    OG Kush: OG Kush stands for “Original Gangster” Kush and originates from the San Fernando Valley in LA.  Best harvested in mid-September, many people consider OG Kush to be one of the strongest strains of Indica because of its high THC count.  This type of marijuana is best grown indoors, under hydroponic conditions.  The side effects of this strain include an increased heart rate and physical stimulation. 

    Blueberry: Blueberry is a combination of strains from Indica and Sativa, but since it its 80% Indica, it is considered an Indica strain.  Best harvested in mid-October, Blueberry gets its name from its flavor and the blue color that each plant possesses.  When grown outdoors, Blueberry keeps most of its flavor, a very fruity, blueberry-like taste.  Blueberry is also best known for its long lasting euphoric effect.  Blueberry is such an excellent strain of marijuana that it has won multiple prizes and nominations. 

    Purple Haze: Purple Haze became a common name to both smokers and non-smokers alike during the 60's and 70's hippie phase.  Full of flavor, Purple Haze is a classic strain of marijuana.  Purple Haze grows tall and possesses purple buds.  This strain can be grown both indoors and outdoors.  Its taste is smooth and its high is uplifting and euphoric.  Many smokers use this strain to smoke socially and medical marijuana patients prefer it for relieving anxiety and muscle tension.  

    Blue Dream: Blue Dream is a strain of marijuana from Northern California where the strains Blueberry and Haze were mixed together.  Blue Dream has dense, puffy buds that have orange hairs and blue/purple hues.  Some describe its taste as tropical or sweet and spicy.  The effects of Blue Dream include a sense of focus, calmness, and relaxation.  Many people chose to use Blue Dream for marijuana food products. Its THC potency is 17%. 

    Also a brief history of this medical plant!

     

    Chapter 1: Marijuana

    Marijuana (known as Cannabis, in the world of science) is a plant that many people use as a pleasurable drug and as a medicine.  Its main compound, THC, is what causes the euphoric effect that many people experience when they use marijuana.  Other than THC, there are 482 compounds in the plant, including cannabidiol, cannabinol, cannabigerol, and tetrahydrocannabivarin. These compounds are what give marijuana its unique properties.

    Many people throughout history and today use marijuana to experience its euphoric effects.  People who smoke or ingest it often report feeling happy, relaxed, and at peace.  The most common side effects of marijuana use includes short-term memory loss, a decrease in motor skills, anxiety, red eyes, and dry mouth.  Despite the legal controversies surrounding the drug, a 2004 study found that 4% of Americans admitted to using it.

    Although marijuana has never killed anybody and it has many proven medical and environmental benefits, as you will soon read in this book, it is probably one of the most controversial topics in society today. It remains illegal in the majority of states and many people who could benefit from its medical properties are having a hard time getting to it in the first place. 

    From the 1950's onward, many have argued that marijuana was a “gateway” drug, meaning that it would encourage people who used it to try “harder” drugs.  Although marijuana has a death rate of 0, it is still considered an illegal drug in the majority of the United States, despite its proven  medical benefits.  At the time of this writing, the only states who have approved marijuana for recreational use are Colorado and Washington State.  21 states have legalized medical marijuana and several states have decriminalized it (meaning that you cannot go to jail for possessing it), but there are still many states who carry harsh marijuana laws.  For example, you can go to jail for 6 months and/or pay a $1,000 fine if you are caught with less than 50 grams in New Jersey.

    Like any plant, there are several different varieties and strains of marijuana.  The two most common strains of marijuana are cannabis Sativa and cannabis Indica.  The different varieties of marijuana are created through cloning and seed breeding.  Marijuana plants that grow in different regions are also considered as varieties.  Marijuana plants are also grown for hemp, which is the fiber from the stem.  Many people use hemp to manufacture every day products like paper, rope, and wood. 

    With over 5,000 different strains and the ability to be grown in almost any environment, marijuana has been around for centuries. 

    The earliest signs of cannabis growth reach as far back as ancient China during 7,000 BC.  Studies have shown that people in ancient China used marijuana for both medical and recreational purposes.  Here is another fun yet intriguing fact: about six years ago, archeologists discovered 2 pounds of cannabis plants in a 2,700-year old Shaman grave. 

    Despite strict laws, modern civilizations followed in the footsteps of their ancestors.  The Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 imposed a federal ban of recreational marijuana use.  

    In 1970, the federal government classified all forms of marijuana as a schedule I controlled substance, implying that it was just as dangerous as narcotics and served no use for medical purposes.  However, that did not stop scientists from studying it and conducting experiments on it.  Amazingly, extensive research over the years has proven that marijuana actually has many benefits to offer to peoples' health and the environment. 

    Nearly 22,000 studies on marijuana have been published within the last couple of years.  Scientists have concluded that it is not possible to overdose on it and it is non-toxic, making if the safest “drug” in the world, unlike its legal counterparts, tobacco and alcohol. 

    It was legal to grow hemp in the United States until 1937.  George Washington and Thomas Jefferson even grew it and were in favor of it.  During World War II, the United States government made the production of hemp legal so that it could be used to manufacture shoe materials, ropes, oils, and anything that was in short supply during that time period.  Interestingly, it was not outlawed because it was considered dangerous—it was because it wood industry viewed it as a threat.  To combat its growth, corporate companies claimed that it was a dangerous substance, that society had a marijuana problem, and that hemp could cause people to become extremely violent. 

    Today, it is only legal to grow hemp in Canada, Russia, China, India, and Europe. 

    Today, the debate over whether marijuana should be federally legalized is a hot one.  In 2013, polls and surveys showed that the majority of Americans supported legalizing marijuana for the first time ever.  At the time of this writing, President Barrack Obama is now looking into removing marijuana off the official list of dangerous drugs.  It is currently considered a Schedule I drug. A Schedule I drug is a drug that has no accepted medical uses but a high abuse potential.  Clearly, the placement of marijuana on Schedule I makes no sense, since there have been many medical breakthroughs.  Though, as of now, marijuana stays classified with serious drugs such as LSD and Meth. 

    In this book, you will read about 100 benefits of marijuana to your health and to the environment, showing that marijuana has no place on Schedule I. You will also read about the different strains (Indica, Sativa, and hybrid) as well as learn the truth about the most common marijuana myths.  Finally, you will see what some of the most famous people are saying about marijuana and you will learn about the death rate of marijuana compared to tobacco, alcohol, and pharmaceutical drugs.  


    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at April 24, 2015 2:48:15 PM PDT
    • 4 posts
    July 27, 2014 2:04:57 AM PDT

    Chapter 6: Death Rate Comparison—Marijuana vs. Tobacco, Alcohol, Prescription Drugs

    Though there have been some crazy (and untrue) myths that people can die from smoking marijuana, marijuana has had and maintains a death rate of 0.  As you know from Chapter 3, marijuana is non-addictive and it can actually benefit yourself health instead of hurting it.  This chapter aims to help you forget everything bad you've heard about marijuana.  The statistics even show that marijuana is safer than tobacco, alcohol, and prescription drugs, all of which are legal in all 50 states.  Yet, marijuana is only legal for recreation in two states and for medical purposes in 21.

    Tobacco.  Tobacco, one of the main ingredients of cigarettes, causes over 443,00 deaths each year.  Cigarettes are responsible for causing lung cancer, respiratory diseases, and overall damages to the lungs.  Studies have found that while tobacco can decrease the speed of air that one can blow out, marijuana can actually increase it.  Although studies also Indicated that heavy or long-term marijuana use could have the opposite effect, researchers noted that cigarette smokers smoke more often than marijuana smokers.  It is believed that marijuana can increase the speed that one can exhale because marijuana smokers take deep inhales while smoking, which may attribute to stronger lungs. 

    Alcohol.  According to the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention, alcohol kills more than 37,000 people each year.  Studies have named alcohol as one of the top most toxic drugs in the United States, compared to marijuana, which is all natural and does not contain anything toxic.  Alcohol increases health costs far more than marijuana does and alcohol can damage the brain.  Finally, alcohol is an addictive drug.  Many people all around the world suffer from the disease that is better known as alcoholism.  Not only does alcohol kill people from directly drinking too much of it, but it can also cause people to fall and hit their heads, throw up and choke on their vomit, and kill themselves and others in drunk driving cases.  Marijuana does not cause any of these things.  Finally, while alcohol is known to cause aggression and leads to many violent crimes, marijuana causes people to relax and be peaceful. 

    Prescription Drugs.  Prescription drugs, mostly painkillers, pose as harmful drugs despite the fact that doctors can legally prescribe them.  Unfortunately, prescription drugs are addictive and although they require a prescription, doctors do not have a system to track them.  Many people go “doctor-shopping” to obtain multiple prescriptions to feed their addictions.  They are even available for sale on the internet, which does not require a prescription. Prescription drug overdoses account for about 45% of overdose deaths each year.

    As you now know from reading Chapter 3, marijuana brings more value and benefits to peoples' lives than all three of these substances combined, yet, all three of them are currently legal under federal law.  While it is true that it is still illegal to possess prescription drugs for which you do not have a valid prescription, it still does not have a significant effect on reducing prescription drug deaths.  


    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at April 24, 2015 2:50:15 PM PDT
    • Moderator
    • 1955 posts
    August 13, 2014 1:42:20 PM PDT

    How should a state medical board respond to a doctor who has a urine drug test that is positive for marijuana?

    This testing occurred as part of the clinic's new random urine drug screening. 

    Should the physician be fired? 

    What if the physician was not acutely impaired, but smoked marijuna a few days ago while on a float trip down Black River in Southern Missouri?

    What if the doctor works in Washington but the hospital administration knows the employee (junior doctor) was in Missouri on a float trip and saw the photos, etc?

    What if the doctor works in Missouri, but went to Seattle for the weekend. What should the Missouri Hospital Administration do?

    ------------------

    Thank you for sharing the book. I found an interesting article in the New England Journal of Medicine about doctors who join marijuana clinics to be the medical director. Apparently the DEA came in and ruffled their feathers. In addition, this reportedly occurred seven times. Now, I am highly skepticall that a federal agency would do something selectively, which really has little effect practially, but does cause a lot of media hype. .My thoughts are that this was an intentional sting operation to see how physicians respond. If the doctor who was director a marijuan clinic is suddenly shocked, and they run out screaming they hate marijuan, then it is pretty obvious that they probably could would not be able to argue in front of a Federal Judge the merits of them being there. 

    , what do you think about it? 

    Do you think that it was a sting operation. I can't imagine federal agents going against state law, and then vivolating the civil rights of physicians over future intent to prescribe marijuana.

    Medical Marijuana, Physicians, and State Law

    George J. Annas, J.D., M.P.H.

    August 6, 2014DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1408965

    "As Massachusetts prepares to implement its new medical-marijuana law, agents of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) have reportedly visited at least seven Massachusetts physicians at their homes or offices and told them they must either give up their DEA registration or sever formal ties with proposed medical-marijuana dispensaries. These encounters were meant to intimidate the physicians and to discourage them from taking an active role in medical-marijuana dispensaries, and they have apparently succeeded. But there are differences between state and federal law, between talking to patients and selling drugs, and between acting as a physician and acting as a marijuana entrepreneur. With medical-marijuana laws poised to come into effect in a majority of states, it seems worthwhile to put medical marijuana in historical and legal context.  On the other hand, once physicians move outside the physician–patient relationship and into the drug-trafficking arena, their speech and actions are not protected, and the federal government may take action against them. In the case most often cited by the courts, the 1975 Supreme Court caseares to implement its new medical-marijuana law, agents of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) have reportedly visited at least seven Massachusetts physicians at their homes or offices and told them they must either give up their DEA registration or sever formal ties with proposed medical-marijuana dispensaries. These encounters were meant to intimidate the physicians and to discourage them from taking an active role in medical-marijuana dispensaries, and they have apparently succeeded. But there are differences between state and federal law, between talking to patients and selling drugs, and between acting as a physician and acting as a marijuana entrepreneur. With medical-marijuana laws poised to come into effect in a majority of states, it seems worthwhile to put medical marijuana in historical and legal context.  On the other hand, once physicians move outside the physician–patient relationship and into the drug-trafficking arena, their speech and actions are not protected, and the federal government may take action against them. In the case most often cited by the courts, the 1975 Supreme Court caseU.S. v. Moore, a physician used his DEA registration to sell methadone prescriptions without following accepted medical practice of taking a patient's history and doing a physical exam. Moore simply wrote a prescription for the number of pills a patient requested and charged more for more pills. The court concluded that Moore, “in practical effect, acted as a large-scale `pusher,' not as a physician.”

     

    ...The DEA seems to be treating at least some Massachusetts physicians who are medical officers or board members of new marijuana dispensaries as drug dealers; I believe that in doing so, it is going too far. Unless a physician seeks to be paid by the dispensary on the basis of sales or volume, it's difficult to see how acting as a medical officer or member of a dispensary's board could constitute drug dealing...

    The Remainder of our Marijuana Threads are here: 

    http://drsocial.org/forums/topic/166/medical-marijuana-good-or-bad

    Patients who are on controlled substance agreements with their physician often have urine testing for drugs of abuse. If the urine drug screen returns positive for marijuana or THC, should the treating physician fire the patient?

    Should the physician fire the patient if the patient was in Missouri, but they would be treated differently if they were in Washington?

    ----

     


    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at April 24, 2015 2:46:22 PM PDT
    • 445 posts
    April 24, 2015 3:18:41 PM PDT

    Dear reader,

    if you are looking for any information related to alcohol vs drugs, marijuana vs tobacco lungs, marijuana vs alcohol vs tobacco, marijuana vs alcohol and tobacco deaths, marijuana vs tobacco, marijuana vs prescription drugs, marijuana death rate, weed vs tobacco, alcohol deaths vs weed deaths, death rate of marijuana you may want to read the following forum posts:

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