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mild heart attack and anti big e

    • 2 posts
    July 9, 2014 8:21:05 AM PDT
    I am pregnant and have the anti big e antibody I had a heart attack on 2005. What are my complications on this pregnancy they have me up and down I am very scared
    • 2 posts
    July 9, 2014 8:22:01 AM PDT
    No medications I still have to see my cardiologist waiting on insurance approval
    • Moderator
    • 1955 posts
    July 9, 2014 2:34:54 PM PDT

    Greetings,

    Thank you kindly for your question.

    How many weeks pregnant are you?

    Have you seen an OBGYN doctor yet?

    You may consider asking them to be referrred to a materno-fetal specialist in the event the neonatal transfusion would be indicated.

    It depends on several factors, one being your titer of anti-E antibody. If you have the report it should say something such as titer 1:128 or 1:64 or 1:32. It has to do with how the laboratory dilutes the specimen and is a semi-quantitative means of measuring the concentration of your antibodies against big E. Please let me know what your titer is.

    Do you know what was the cause of your prior heart attack?

    What did they tell you after your last heart attack?

    Do you know what your ejection fraction is?

    Are you able to walk a mile without difficulty?

    The above information is from the following reference. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/273995-overview#aw2aab6b7 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2000.tb11662.x/asset/j.1471-0528.2000.tb11662.x.pdf

    Insurance approval, sigh, receiving and providing healthcare is for the rich only, but it should't be that way. I know because I don't have health insurance, so I can identify with concerns of patients quite well. If you had money fall from the sky, you would likely have doctors and specialists in abundance and highest probability of best outcome for your fetus and yourself..

    There is a statistically significant disparity in the proportion of persons from below the poverty line that become physicians. Part of this is probably due to medical regulation. If you can afford a lawyer, you can get justice when students encounter corruption within the system.

    How much justice and healthcare can you afford is a sad, but true claim.

    -BrettMD


    This post was edited by DrSocial Admin at August 15, 2014 3:54:46 AM PDT