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05 Vessels of Wearn: Signs Around the World

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    April 27, 2014 10:44:12 PM PDT

    Please provide your kind consideration to the distinction between the "vessels of Wearn." and the "Thebesian veins"

     

    Vessels of Wearn at Myrtle Beach

     

    Vessels of Wearn = eponym
    Arteriovessels cardiacae minimae

    In 1933, Joseph Treolar Wearn utilized macroscopic casting along with serial microscopic sectioning to define arteries of the heart [1] . Dr. Wearn defined the arteriosinusoidal and arterioluminal vessels (AS/AL-vv) and noted that they have arterial components at their proximal origin and lose their internal elastic lamina and medial smooth muscle as they progress distally becoming simple endothelial lined tubes. Thus, these are referred to as vessels although they have arterial origin. For many years, physicians did not have a pronoun specifically for the Arteriosinusoidal and Arterioluminal vessels when identifying them through radiographic imaging. Since they share some overlap in their size, it often may be inaccurate to refer to an identified arterial vessel as either the sinusoidal or the luminal type.
    With no term to define these vessels when identified, some resorted to referring to them as the "vessels of Thebesius." Others referred to them by a more broad term: ventriculocoronary arterial connections (VCACs). VCACs is not a precise term because it could also include a fistula from trauma, which is not usually a vessel. Thus, there was a need for an appropriate term to define the vessels. Wearn was too humble to name them after himself, but had he; there might be less confusion in the literature. Wearn referred to the macroscopic appreciation of them as luminal vessels. If it is considered axiomatic that using the same term for both a single vessel, and a group of vessels could result in ambiguity in the medical literature.

    For example, the luminal vessels would have one definition, which is the direct large connections to the heart chambers, and then another definition in which it is used referring to all of the connections between the coronary arteries and heart chambers including the (1) arterioluminal vessels, the (2) arteriosinusoidal arteries


    potentially confusing as the
    A. "Luminal vessels" would be composed of the
    1. Arteriosinusoidal vessels
    2. Arterioluminal vessels


    A more precise name was applied to the vessels 2012 [2] . The term was named in honor of their discoverer, Joseph T. Wearn. One might state that we should instead call them the "vessels of Vieussens." The author of this article states that such nomenclature might be discussed, but then it would cause more confusion and provide less granularity as the arteriosinusoidal and arterioluminal vessels presumably prevent different clinically. This topic is discussed further in the appendix.


    1. ^ Wearn, Joseph T.; Mettier, Stacy R.; Klumpp, Theodore G.; Zschiesche, Louise J. (1 December 1933). "The nature of the vascular communications between the coronary arteries and the chambers of the heart". American Heart Journal 9 (2): 143–164. doi:10.1016/S0002-8703(33)90711-5.
    2. ^ Snodgrass, Brett Thomas (1 July 2012). "Vessels Described by Thebesius and Pratt Are Distinct From Those Described by Vieussens and Wearn". The American Journal of Cardiology 110 (1): 160. doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.04.005.
    3. ^ Krishnan, U.; Schmitt, M. (31 March 2008). "Persistent Thebesian Sinusoids Presenting as Ischemic Heart Disease". Circulation 117 (16): e315–e316.doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.748863.

    However, that may be less favorable as Vieussens did not provide quantitive measurements of the, nor did he distinguish the myocardial sinusoids from them. If we were to do that, we would no longer have arteriosinusoidal vessels. The distinction of the myocardial sinusoids and the vessels would be described with knowledge that only one who has never prepared micscropic sections of the heart could details.
    Lack of an appropriate term for the vessels of Wearn is the probable reason some have referred to them as Thebesian sinusoids.[3] In conclusion, the vessels of Wearn are distinct connections described by Wearn and there is nothing Thebesian or venular about them.
    [edit]References


    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at July 11, 2014 11:46:03 PM PDT
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    May 5, 2014 12:10:42 PM PDT

    vessels of Wearn

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at May 11, 2014 10:25:51 AM PDT
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    May 11, 2014 10:18:17 AM PDT

    Nice young man raising awareness of Vessels of Wearn


    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at May 26, 2014 3:49:35 AM PDT
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    May 11, 2014 10:27:07 AM PDT

    vessels of Wearn 1 of 2 Lebanon

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    May 19, 2014 10:05:14 PM PDT

    Do the vessels of Wearn exist? 

     

    Have I been published repeatedly without any original bench research myself? 

     

    Yes, yes I have. 

    http://bit.ly/JTWearn

     

    Vesels of Wearn are arteries

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    • 1957 posts
    May 19, 2014 10:07:02 PM PDT

    Do the vessels of Wearn exist? 

     

    Have I been invited to an international conference based not on thevessels of Wearn Anatomy Histology merits of my own work, but on that of Joseph Treolar Wearn, MD? 

     

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    • 1957 posts
    May 19, 2014 10:09:35 PM PDT

    Are the vessels of Wearn the same as the Thebesian veins? 

     

    Vessels of Wearn v. Thebesian veins

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    May 20, 2014 4:19:54 PM PDT

    The vessels of Wearn

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    May 25, 2014 8:39:12 PM PDT
    Please take this brief survey on your opinion of the heart's #anatomy#

    #heart# #medical# #doctor# #health# #hcsm# #medicalschool# #ptsafety# #healthy# #gym# #STEM# #Science# #histology# #artery# #vein# #VesselofWearn# #MyocardialSinusoid# #Thebesian#

    http://drsocial.org/forums/topic/230/vessels-of-wearn-p1-signs-aroun/view/post_id/493
    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at May 25, 2014 8:39:52 PM PDT
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    June 7, 2014 2:12:50 AM PDT

    Was a vessel of Wearn present throughout life but unappreciable due to sloughing?  

    Vessels_of_Wearn


    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at June 7, 2014 2:13:17 AM PDT
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    June 7, 2014 2:17:36 AM PDT

    Model holds sign which reads: "vessels of Wearn."

     

    Models and vessels of Wearn

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    June 7, 2014 3:00:52 AM PDT

    Vasa Wearn. Images created by graphical artists.

    Vessel of Wearn

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    June 7, 2014 3:04:23 AM PDT

    Vessels of Wearn photgraph taken in China. Vessels of Wearn, photo taken in China. It costs some to pay people to do this, but I want to help improve medical research and the cost of inaccurate information on medical literature and researcher's time and money has not been negligible.Chinese Model vessels of Wearn

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    June 8, 2014 12:10:25 AM PDT

    Well, this sign isn't about the vessels of Wearn, but I wanted to share a positive photograph from India with a lovely background.

     

    India Supporting Psoriasis Research

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    July 23, 2014 6:30:36 PM PDT

    Terminologia Anatomica

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
     

    Terminologia Anatomica (TA) is the international standard on human anatomic terminology. It was developed by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology (FCAT) and the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists (IFAA) and was released in 1998.[1] It supersedes the previous standard, Nomina Anatomica.[2] Terminologia Anatomica contains terminology for about 7500 human gross (macroscopic) anatomical structures.[3] In April 2011, Terminologia Anatomica was published online by the Federative International Programme on Anatomical Terminologies (FIPAT), the successor of FCAT.

      

    http://www.amazon.com/Terminologia-Anatomica-International-Anatomical-Terminology/dp/3131143622/

     

    -BrettMD


    This post was edited by Brett Snodgrass at July 23, 2014 6:32:30 PM PDT
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    January 21, 2015 9:07:03 AM PST
    Vessels of Wearn are located on the arterial side of the capillary bed, and can be considered the counterpart of the Thebesian veins. It is important to use distinct terms for the anatomical location is disparate. Thebesian vein anatomy functionally spans the macroscopic, microscopic divide and this may be part of the reason that most autopsies do not identify either the vessels of Wearn nor the SMALLEST CARDIAC VEINS (venae cardiacae minimae).

    When the Thebesian valve and the coronary sinus are not present, the blood flows through the small cardiac veins (vasa Thebesii) instead of through the Great Cardiac Vein -> Coronary Sinus, and into the right atrium.

    The "smallest cardiac arteries," or arteriae cardiacae minimae (actually defined partially by what they connect), have made an appearance in Indonesia.

    Please feel free to suggest the next country for the vessels of Wearn to be featured in.

    Comments and suggestions are welcome.
    Thank you for reading.
    -BrettMD
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    January 30, 2015 2:59:55 PM PST

     

    Vessels of Wearn in Venezuala

    Vessels of Wearn

            in Venezuela